Writing Disability Inclusive Job Ads

 

With Disability Awareness Day happening at the end of the week on July 12th, we thought we’d share some info on how businesses can become more disability inclusive. Employing disabled people means your workforce is far more likely to gain insight and understanding and is far more likely to talk openly about disability and challenge the status quo. It also brings huge business benefits to the company.

A simple step employers can take to keep disability awareness at front of mind and improve accessibility to all their opportunities is by writing job adverts that appeal to disabled candidates.

So, here are some great tips we found from Evenbreak on how to write a disability inclusive job ad:

 

1. Make it clear from the offset that YOUR company commits to equality.

Disabled candidates have already had to overcome many challenges. They often face discrimination daily. They are less likely to engage with companies that only pay lip service to equality. The paragraph that begins “We are an equal opportunities employer…” is often dropped at the end of a job ad.  Does anyone ever utter a ‘yippee’ at seeing this included? Does anyone ever read to the end of the job ad? A study by TheLadders, found that job seekers spend an average of 49.7 seconds reading a job advert before deciding whether it was a fit. Instead, shout out about your inclusive culture at the top of the job ad. Talk to job seekers in a human voice about the changes your company has made to make sure they are open to all. Tell us about your culture and any initiatives you’ve launched. Add a bit of personality – this is your chance to sparkle! For tips on writing in a human voice, have a peek at what Founder of Human Workplace Liz Ryan has to say on the subject.

 

2. Avoid the never-ending list of bullet pointed job responsibilities.

It’s understandable that recruiting managers have a long list in mind of skills they’d like for each role. But this approach can at best, turn off brilliant candidates. At worst, it makes companies look delusional, if the list of wants doesn’t tally up with the benefits offered.  Disabled candidates are very unlikely to apply for jobs they don’t believe they’re qualified for. If anything, candidates are usually overqualified.  One study found more than half of disabled people have applied for jobs they know they are overqualified for. Instead of listing ‘employer wants’ for a role, consider listing only the essential ‘employer needs’. Use the extra word count to market your company to candidates. To receive three times as many applications and attract a better quality of candidate write a job ad that focuses on candidate needs. Not employers.

 

3. Tell candidates what you do differently and how you work smart.

Smart companies have fast cottoned on to the benefits of flexible working. With today’s technology there’s no need to commute an hour, to sit at a desk to work, to commute another hour home. The COVID-19 crisis has highlighted the possibilities of this even further. Agile working is one of the smart working initiatives used by savvy employers to add value to their workforce.

Some benefits to employers include:

  • access to a more diverse talent pool
  • reduced attrition
  • increased productivity

Some benefits to employees include:

  • opportunities for disabled candidates
  • a better quality of life
  • reduced travel costs
  • increased time spent with family

By embracing smart working you’ll be able to attract a greater number of disabled candidates and a larger pool of talent.

 

4. Be mindful of the language you use.

Job ads often come peppered with industry specific jargon.  Acronyms and corporate buzz words like “KPI,” “onboarding”, “ITIL”, “compliance” are off putting.  These can not only send your job seeker to sleep but also alienate potential candidates unfamiliar with your company’s lingo. Instead, use straightforward language. Tell candidates more about the potential career pathway offered. What does the job entail day to day? What is your company’s mission? What skills might your ideal candidate have?

 

5. Make it clear you judge candidates only on how well they fit the job criteria.

More and more businesses are signing up to become Disability Confident Employers. The scheme helps people identify those employers committed to equality in the workplace. Disabled candidates look for employers with good recruitment policies.  If your company:

  • is a Disability Confident Employer
  • offers a guaranteed interview scheme
  • uses disabled jobs boards such as Evenbreak

Then make sure this is obvious across your job ads, social media and marketing materials.  Tell candidates about what makes you great, they’re keen to find you!

 

Inclusive Recruiting is proud to be a Disability Confident Employer.